My Way of Wing Chun

The Learning Curve

Siu Lim Tao – Stillness

Laozi’s Dao De Jing mentions how the world was created and also how things work. Wing Chun Kuen was created from nothing and from Wing Chun Kuen many Wing Chun skills have been created. Then these Wing Chun skills will go back to nothing. This is how nature works you were born from nothing, then you do a lot of things in this world, finally you die and go back to nothing.

“Everything is created from nothing and also created by something.” – Dao De Jing

When you study Wing Chun Kuen, the first thing you have to learn is the form “Siu Lim Tao”. The first part of the form you have to do very slowly. Many people wonder why this is. Some will think that Wing Chun is a martial art, which is supposed to be quick and powerful. There are other people who will think the opposite, that this is Qigong training that will help to make you powerful, particularly your one-inch punch.

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Wong Shun Leung – The Logic Behind Wing Chun

One of the top Wing Chun fighters at Yip Man‘s hong kong school, Sifu Leung taught Bruce Lee privately for one-and-a half-years and recalled “his Kung-Fu was not very good he couldn’t fight.” Leung’s own introduction to the Wing Chun system was less than stellar he challenged Yip Man to a trial by combat, convinced he could defeat him. When m a n easily won, Leung became a lifelong believer and disciple of the system that Bruce Lee would eventually turn into the most popular Kung-Fu style ever taught. Yip Man, seeing more in Lee than others, predicted to the incredulous Leung that, “this little kid will make Wing Chun famous.”

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The Spread of Wing Chun

In this article, Grandmaster Ip Chun refers to certain controversial individuals in Wing Chun, ex-students of Grandmaster Ip Man, that after leaving Hing Kong, have said some things over the time that were not true regarding their learning experience under Grandmaster Ip Man in order to make a better living. (Path Seeker)

Ip Man starting teaching Wing Chun in the 1950s in Hong Hong and he died in 1972. In just over twenty years of teaching he made Wing Chun very popular and it spread throughout the world.

Whether they are just beginners or more experienced people, I would estimate that there are about 1 million people practising Wing Chun. In the 20 years that my father taught, he relied on his own resources and received no outside support. So the fact that Wing Chun became so popular is quite remarkable. In fact, there are actually some Wing Chun practitioners who are investigating why Wing Chun is so popular. In this article, I will express my ideas of why this is so and why it is still spreading.

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Notes on Hard/Soft Hawkins Cheung Wing Chun

I am a student of Hawkins Cheung, and as this is a forum on my sifu’s site. I have some thoughts on his teachings that may be of interest to some of you. I have been with Sifu for 14 years, and he has been a great influence on me. I enjoy sharing dialogue with others that are on a true path. Here are some thoughts on the “hard way” and the “soft way” in Sifu Hawkins Cheung’s system:To consider the whole of Wing Chun, beyond the various techniques, we must look at the two sides of the W.C. character; the “hard” and the “soft”. The yin-yang, the black-white, sun-moon, etc. . . characters of the system.

From the waist up, most W.C. practitioners are relatively the same. The elbows are in more with one system than another, or leg positioning changes slightly, but basically the tan sao is the tan sao, the lop is the lop, and the bong is the bong. However, how we apply them is important to understand. Why? Because if we are not trying to understand how to apply our art more and more, we are just spinning our wheels.

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The Art of Sticking Hands

Chi Sau is the most important part of Wing Chun training. The purpose of Chi Sau is to develop your instinct and sensitivity to your opponent, so when he moves you can react straight away. However Chi Sau is not the same thing as fighting though it will help you to develop your fighting skill. Chi Sau is also not the same thing as sparring. How are they different and how does Chi Sau develop fighting skill?

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The Centre Line Part 2: Misconceptions

Last time we looked at the Centreline and found that there were in fact three Centrelines to consider, the Jik Sin (Centre Line), Ji Ng Sin (Meridian Line) and the Centre of Gravity. Now we will look at how Centreline theory is commonly misunderstood.

Someone once made a passing comment about Wing Chun. It went something like, “Wing Chun only blocks attacks that come in along the centreline”. This statement implies that unless your opponent attacks you along the centreline then you will not bother defending yourself against this attack. So for example, if your opponent were to attack you with a hooking, circular punch, then you would not bother to block them. This is of course nonsense. Who will allow someone to hit them just because they attack you in a different way?

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The Centre Line Part 1: A Definition?

One of the most important principles in Wing Chun is Centre Line Theory. In essence, this is a simple principle and once understood will help your practice no end. However, to understand Centre Line Theory we must take into account three “different” Centres.

The Centre Line, as can be seen in Fig 1, is the Centre Line which divides the body into two running vertically from the top of the head down through the body. It is this line that Wing Chun emphasises when attack- ing and defending. This line is called Jik Sin. When standing directly opposite your opponent, then your Jik Sins will also face each other. In this case, it is simple to work your line of attack. Fig 2.

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The Best Times by Grandmaster Ip Chun

During this trip to England, somebody in one of my seminars asked me when the best time in my life was. I said, “Now, this moment is the best time”. If he asks me the same question next year, I will answer the same.

By this I mean that every year I am happier and happier. I started giving seminars abroad in 1981 so I have been doing them for about seventeen years. Now I am seventy four. I am still happy and healthy and am still able to travel all over the world giving seminars about Wing Chun. I don’t think about retirement if I am still able to teach.

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Yee Gee Kim Yeun Ma

The basic stance of Wing Chun Kuen is called the “Yee Gee Kim Yeun Ma”. To many it looks very simple and at the same time very strange in appearance. Some other styles of Kung Fu say they have similar stances, but these are very superficial comparisons. Whatever the case, this is a very important stance for all Wing Chun practitioners.

The first thing you learn when you begin Wing Chun is the basic stance ‘Yee Gee Kim Yuen Ma’.  This stance is formed by:

  1. Stand straight (but relaxed) with your feet together and your hands hanging at your sides
  2. Slightly bend your knees and raise your hands up to the sides of your chest forming ‘loose* fists. Keep your head upright and look straight ahead.
  3. Keeping your back straight and head upright, open your toes outwards. This is done by swiveling on your heels. Then turn your heels out, by swiveling on the balls of your feet, until they arc slightly wider then your toes. It is important not to just twist the feet. Although the feet move, you should allow your legs to turn from the hips.

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A Passion for Wing Chun (Part 2)

Master Wong Shun Leung is well known in the martial arts world. When he was younger he went out to try his Wing Chun against other styles of martial art. His intent was not to just fight, he wanted to see how Wing Chun. It is this search for perfection that has made him one of Wing Chun’s most famous ambassador

Wing Chun Kuen is said to be some four hundred years old. Its origins and early history are quickly becoming an area of a great deal of debate. Whatever the early history, today Wing Chun is perhaps the most popular Chinese style of Kung Fu.

The late grandmaster Yip Man is now a legendary figure in Chinese Martial Arts circles and the man responsible for bringing Wing Chun Kuen into the modern world. Yip Man taught many people and one of his most respected students is Master Wong Shun Leung.

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