My Way of Wing Chun

The Learning Curve

Tag Archives: chi sau

Footwork

Many people today practice Wing Chun, Chi Sau (sticking hands). However, they only stand in the same position and they do not move their feet. In this way it is very easy to lose a lot of energy, because when your opponent is very strong and they are attacking you, you cannot move to avoid their power.

The most common way we do to avoid an opponent’s power is to change your technique such as changing from the Bong Sau to Tan Sau or the other way round. Of course, there are other techniques you can use by yourselves but because you do not move your stance, you have to use more strength. Therefore we see many people, who do Chi Sau just like they are fighting. With this kind of skill, only the stronger and bigger guy will win easily. Even if you beat up your opponent, you can also suffer injury, so this is not the best way for Chi Sau.

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The Spread of Wing Chun

In this article, Grandmaster Ip Chun refers to certain controversial individuals in Wing Chun, ex-students of Grandmaster Ip Man, that after leaving Hing Kong, have said some things over the time that were not true regarding their learning experience under Grandmaster Ip Man in order to make a better living. (Path Seeker)

Ip Man starting teaching Wing Chun in the 1950s in Hong Hong and he died in 1972. In just over twenty years of teaching he made Wing Chun very popular and it spread throughout the world.

Whether they are just beginners or more experienced people, I would estimate that there are about 1 million people practising Wing Chun. In the 20 years that my father taught, he relied on his own resources and received no outside support. So the fact that Wing Chun became so popular is quite remarkable. In fact, there are actually some Wing Chun practitioners who are investigating why Wing Chun is so popular. In this article, I will express my ideas of why this is so and why it is still spreading.

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Notes on Hard/Soft Hawkins Cheung Wing Chun

I am a student of Hawkins Cheung, and as this is a forum on my sifu’s site. I have some thoughts on his teachings that may be of interest to some of you. I have been with Sifu for 14 years, and he has been a great influence on me. I enjoy sharing dialogue with others that are on a true path. Here are some thoughts on the “hard way” and the “soft way” in Sifu Hawkins Cheung’s system:To consider the whole of Wing Chun, beyond the various techniques, we must look at the two sides of the W.C. character; the “hard” and the “soft”. The yin-yang, the black-white, sun-moon, etc. . . characters of the system.

From the waist up, most W.C. practitioners are relatively the same. The elbows are in more with one system than another, or leg positioning changes slightly, but basically the tan sao is the tan sao, the lop is the lop, and the bong is the bong. However, how we apply them is important to understand. Why? Because if we are not trying to understand how to apply our art more and more, we are just spinning our wheels.

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The Art of Sticking Hands

Chi Sau is the most important part of Wing Chun training. The purpose of Chi Sau is to develop your instinct and sensitivity to your opponent, so when he moves you can react straight away. However Chi Sau is not the same thing as fighting though it will help you to develop your fighting skill. Chi Sau is also not the same thing as sparring. How are they different and how does Chi Sau develop fighting skill?

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The Best Times by Grandmaster Ip Chun

During this trip to England, somebody in one of my seminars asked me when the best time in my life was. I said, “Now, this moment is the best time”. If he asks me the same question next year, I will answer the same.

By this I mean that every year I am happier and happier. I started giving seminars abroad in 1981 so I have been doing them for about seventeen years. Now I am seventy four. I am still happy and healthy and am still able to travel all over the world giving seminars about Wing Chun. I don’t think about retirement if I am still able to teach.

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Wing Chun Wisdom by Sigung Ip Chun (Part 2)

Like all martial arts Wing Chun requires a great deal of practise. However practise alone is not enough. You must spend time listening to your teacher and seniors who can pass on valuable knowledge. Knowledge which is not written in any texts, as it comes from a culmination of their own experiences, which are unique. So the wise man will recognise an opportunity to learn from the wiser and more knowledgeable, and in the Wing Chun world who could be wiser than Grandmaster Yip Chun.
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Wing Chun Wisdom by Sigung Ip Chun (Part 1)

Those of you who know Wing Chun will know of it effectiveness, even for those who do not posses the muscles of Arnold Schwarzenegger and the acrobatic ability of Jackie Chan. Such is the ingenuity of the Wing Chun principles, means that it is suitable for everyone, even the smallest can be deadly! Perhaps the best example of this today is Grandmaster Yip Chun. Barely more than five feet tall his size belies his skill. Playing Chi Sau (Sticking Hands) with him is an astounding experience!
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Bruce Lee’s Mother Art

To understand Bruce and his martial art, you have to look at his mother art, wing chun. Wing chun in the 1950s was a popular fighting system because of its reputation in challenge fights with other gung-fu Systems. Wing chun was noted for its simple, direct, economical movement and non-classical style.

Many joined and wanted to learn how to fight. Because of the reputation of wing chun, Bruce and I joined. The thing about wing chun is once you start the first form, you feel frustrated. We questioned, “Why do we have to learn this? How can you fight like this?” Everyone wanted to learn the siu nim tao quickly, so they could move onto the sticking hands exercise. The dan chi sao (single sticking hand) exercise was no fun, so the younger students wanted to get through that even quicker. When you finally learned the double sticking hands exercise, we felt excited and thought, “I can fight now! I know wing chun now!” We liked to copy the seniors. If you could land a punch on your opponent, you felt very excited. “I can beat him now,” was our first thought. So everyone wanted to beat his partner first so he could be the top dog.

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