My Way of Wing Chun

The Learning Curve

Tag Archives: YipMan

What It Really Takes to Become Good In Wing Chun?

Lets not worry for the moment what “good” actually means…

The short answer is – practice. Yep that’s right. Good old practice and many many repetitions. I think, many people these days obsessed a little bit too much in their search for the most experienced and the most credible Sifu. Sifu that can prove the purity of his lineage, tracing back directly to Yip Man.

IMHO, no Sifu, not even Yip Man him self can help you if you do not practice. This applies to everyone without exclusions. There is no magic wand, shortcuts or secret behind door techniques – just practice, practice and again practice. Yip Man himself can be teaching you but, if you do not practice diligently, then the time spent will not yield any results.

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My Take on William Cheung Wing Chun Controversy

In my About page I mentioned that I spent six months (before moving away) in one of Australia’s Wing Chun schools that follows the W. Cheung (WC hereafter) lineage and teaches the so-called Traditional Wing Chun (TWC). The school I am talking about is actually WC’s head quarters in Melbourne, Australia.

So, who is WC as we know him? He is a well-known persona in the Wing Chun world today. He has published many books, has done and is still doing Wing Chun seminars all over the world and has setup his own Wing Chun association with schools, franchises & affiliations in many countries around the world.

The big question here is:
How did WC succeed becoming such a prominent (some may say “controversial”) figure in Wing Chun?

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Bruce Lee Discovers Jeet Kuen Do

Bruce Lee went back to Hong Kong to learn more from his teacher, the great Yip Man. He returned to the United States with a new art called Jeet Kune Do.

After Bruce left Hong Kong, I went to Australia to attend college. We still stayed in touch by writing to each other. He told me he was working part time at Ruby Chow’s restaurant in Seattle and teaching a few students wing chun as well as some of Uncle Shiu’s northern style kung-fu high kicks. He wrote that he loved wing chun very much and he wanted to go back to Hong Kong to learn the rest of the system.

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